Naïve or Inaccurate Claims about Highway Safety Improvements do More Harm than Good

Claims that this-or-that highway safety program or this-or-that new idea has had a profound effect on road deaths are commonly very misleading, and a new claim from Alabama undoubtedly comes into this category.
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Astonishingly, the USA Does Not Meet the Basic Road Safety Standards of the W.H.O.

While it is something one might reasonably expect only in relation to poorer, “third-world” countries, the United States of America fails to do well in any of the legislative requirements to achieve basic standards of road safety, as outlined in the most-recent edition of the Global Status Report on Road Safety, by the World Health Organisation [WHO].

W.H.O. Global Status Report on Road Safety 2015 - Front Cover
W.H.O. Global Status Report on Road Safety 2015 – Front Cover
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New York is Top State in USA Enforcement Efforts to Make Highways Safer

NYS DMV Press Release – Monday, July 24, 2017

New York is the top state in the nation in taking steps to reduce injuries and fatalities on its roadways, a recent report from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) says. No state has taken as many steps to curtail the number of crashes as the Empire State. As a result, New York had one of the lowest rates of traffic fatalities per 100,000 residents in the nation, according to 2013 data cited in the report.

NYS DMV logo

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ADoNA: The Clear Leader in U.S. Driver Safety and Training – a Research Victory

For over ten years, Advanced Drivers of North America [ADoNA] has been teaching the important fact that official “overall stopping distances” for cars have been inaccurate and needed to be treated as being significantly longer than previously thought.  Now, at last, our own calculations have been proven appropriate and extremely accurate.

An excellent graphic from Brake showing the old versus new 'overall stopping distances' in which each car length represents 13 feet.
An excellent graphic from Brake showing the old versus new ‘overall stopping distances’ in which each car length represents 13 feet. (New distances shown above old distances, at each speed.)

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USA: 10 Things Truck Drivers Do that Get them Pulled Over

Even without seeing the sub-headings, one can quickly deduce that the informative article linked below has been written by a retired highway patrol police officer.

Although you may not agree, all American drivers have a much easier time of it than do European drivers, the latter of whom can typically be stopped just because the police officer wishes to do so.  No other reason is required, although it is only right and proper that such ‘random stops’ can not be for racial or other wrongful discriminatory purposes.

Photo of a semi-tractor-trailer at night.
Semi-tractor-trailer at night.

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The Most Popular 5 Posts in the First 8 Weeks of the New ADoNA Website

To help new visitors to this Website save time by seeing just those posts that have gained the most interest, here is the first of what will be a series of periodic lists, and on this occasion these five are from the 71 topics posted so far (use the ‘Archives’ or ‘Categories’ in the right-hand sidebar to view more):

1. It’s Mirror-Signal NOT Signal-Mirror, Despite Bad Advice for 100 Years!

The car with a matched pair of rear, high-intensity fog lights will clearly remain more visible than even cars nearer the camera that have only their regular rear lights to rely upon. Copyright image.

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NTSB Safety Compass has not Published my Reply to their “Best Days of Their Lives” Blog, but it’s Important

One week ago, on July 10, 2017, the National Transportation Safety Board [NTSB] published their periodic “Safety Compass” blog.  The post in question was called “Best Days of Their Lives” and is very good, in relation to the safety of young drivers.

Photograph of two roadside memorials, on opposite sides of a rural road, and from two separate crashes.
Not one but two memorials for young people, from two separate crashes on either side of the road at this location in Illinois. Photo: Copyright 2012.

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The Unmatched ‘Driver Safety’ Resume of ADoNA CEO & Chief Instructor Eddie Wren has been Updated

Photograph of a large semi-tractor-trailer coming the other way on a gravel road.
If your team has to work in rural areas — as many of our clients’ personnel do — then amongst other things we teach safe driving on gravel roads, even if you meet a big truck like this coming the other way! (Copyright image.)

Advanced Drivers of North America’s CEO & Chief Instructor, Eddie Wren, has an entirely unmatched resume within North American road safety and driver training circles, and it has just been updated.

See how ADoNA, either through consultancy or driver training, can best help your organization.  Contact us.

USA: Police Chief Attacks Proposed Increase in Size of Big Rigs

Excerpt: [A chief of police in Wisconsin] has serious concerns with proposals in Congress that would allow heavier and longer rigs on  highways because these proposals would dramatically increase the danger faced by everyday drivers.

Photo looking down on a fast-moving semi-tractor-trailer.
Semi-tractor-trailer. Copyright image.

The proposal calls for increasing trucks weights nationwide from 80,000 to 91,000 pounds, and another calls for increasing the length of double-trailer trucks by 10 feet, to 91 feet in length.

…Bigger trucks may mean increased profit margins for the handful of companies that would benefit, they also pose substantial safety risks to motorists…

Read the full opinion-piece from the Gazette Extra on this important topic.

ADoNA Comments

Already more than 4,000 people are killed each year in the USA in crashes involving large trucks.  One factor in this bad scenario is the long hours that drivers are allowed to work, behind the wheel, each week — far more than in other countries that have much lower road-death rates than does America.  Making trucks larger and therefor even harder to stop should be seen as an extra factor that is likely to increase the number of deaths even further.

Eddie Wren, CEO & Chief InstructorAdvanced Drivers of North America

Comparing the Evil 9/11 Attack to U.S. Road Safety is Awful

Some people think it is wrong to make the following comparison so I will apologize now to anyone who is offended, but the ongoing situation is so pointless and so crucial to the well-being of Americans that I hope you will forgive me for doing so:

Photo of the Freedom Tower, a symbol of defiance and a great nation. (Photo by Phil Dolby / Wikicommons license)
A symbol of defiance and a great nation. (Photo by Phil Dolby / Wikicommons license)

Quote:

“September 11, 2017, will be the 16th anniversary of the evil attacks on four planes, the World Trade Center, and the Pentagon, but did you know that for every single person killed on that truly awful day, over 200 people have since been killed on America’s roads?  Yes, a total of almost two-thirds of a million people slaughtered in U.S. highway crashes, plus around 40 million injured, in just 16 years.  And almost all Americans, including supposedly responsible politicians, completely ignore this hideous and  unnecessary travesty because what?”  Eddie Wren, Advanced Drivers of North America, Inc. — July 13, 2017.

 

Also see: Ranking Countries for Road Safety – the ‘Per Capita’ Rate, 2015  (2015 being the latest figures available as at July 2017.  Figures for 2016 should become available within weeks.)