Around 3,000 Americans are Killed by Vehicles Each Year just on Parking Lots, Driveways and Private Roads

According to the National Safety Council [NSC], the number of people killed in the USA during 2017 in road accidents once again exceeded 40,000, following major increases in such deaths during the years since the end of the financial recession.

Aerial view of cars and pedestrians in a parking lot.
People innocently walking across a parking lot, oblivious to risk, yet several vehicles are unsafely parked — nose inwards, rather than backing into the slot and parking nose-outwards — just one thing that increases the risk, especially when children are around. (Copyright image.)

A year ago, the NSC estimated that the 2016 death toll was about 3,000 fatalities more than the eventual official figure of 37,461 which was subsequently issued by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration [NHTSA], however the NSC explain this apparent discrepancy with the fact that ‘the government counts only deaths on public roads, while the council includes parking lots, driveways and private roads.’

In other words, about 3,000 “additional” people — an average of eight per day — are killed each year in vehicular crashes but do not qualify for inclusion in the official statistics, yet this is an additional eight percent and a lot of those killed in such circumstances are children.  The fact that these incidents involve deaths on parking lots and private driveways serves to illustrate the true level of dangers in places than many people unthinkingly tend to dismiss as being low-risk locations, but that is clearly not the case.

As always, our ADoNA defensive and advanced safe driving courses include research-based, best-practise methods to help your corporate drivers or chauffeurs stay safe and protect other people in relevant locations.

You can read the full article, from USA Today, regarding the NSC estimate for 2017 road deaths.

Should we Call them Road ‘Accidents’ or ‘Crashes’? It’s Actually an Important Distinction!

The incidents which generations of people have grown up calling “road accidents” or “highway accidents” are wrongly named — they need to be referred to as crashes or collisions — but if this sounds like nothing more than silly word-play and semantics to you, read on, because there is a very important reason behind it.

Photo of an SUV in Florida narrowly avoiding a collision with a semi tractor-trailer that rightlytly had to go wide in order to make a sharp right turn and which had been signalling the intended turn correctly for plenty of time. Classic unattentive driving by the person in the SUV.
The driver in this SUV in Florida brakes hard and narrowly avoids a collision with a semi tractor-trailer that correctly had to go wide in order to make a sharp right turn and which had been signalling the intended turn for plenty of time. Sadly, this was classic and potentially lethal inattentive driving by the person in the SUV.   (Copyright image.)   [1]
Continue reading “Should we Call them Road ‘Accidents’ or ‘Crashes’? It’s Actually an Important Distinction!”

USA Performance in Multi-National Road-Death Rates

Clearly, it makes no sense to compare the actual number of people killed in road crashes in a large, heavily-populated nation to the equivalent  number for a small, lightly-populated country. Instead, such deaths must be measured against valid benchmarks:

  • Deaths per 100,000 members of the population – the per capita rate.
  • Deaths per one billion vehicle kilometres (the per distance travelled rate)
  • Deaths per 10,000 registered motor vehicles in the country

In general, it only makes sense to compare nations that have significant factors in common, and one such group is the wealthier, developed countries that are member-nations of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

Figures for each country’s road casualty statistics take 2-3 years to be finalized, so the latest available figures at any point in time are inevitably from 2-3 years previously.

The most recent figures relative to the USA, as at May 2017, are listed on page 24 of the OECD/ITF Road Safety Annual Report, 2016 (2017 not yet published) and are summarized as follows:

Road deaths per 100,000 inhabitants

  • Countries providing data: 32
  • America’s ranking in list: 30th
  • Best rates:     1.2 (Iceland)* — 2.8 Sweden — 2.9 UK & Norway
  • USA rate:      10.2
  • Worst rates: 10.2 (USA) — 11.9 (Chile) — 12.4 (Argentina)
  • NOTE: Iceland, with its rate of just 1.2, has such a small population that its rate can vary by up to 300% in a one year period.

Road deaths per billion vehicle-kilometres (USA uses 100 million miles)

  • Countries providing data: 21
  • America’s ranking in list: 18th
  • Best rates:    3.4 (Sweden & Norway) — 3.6 (UK & Denmark)
  • USA Rate:      6.7
  • Worst rates:  7.1 (Belgium & New Zealand) — 15.5 (Korea)

Road deaths per 10,000 registered vehicles

  • Countries providing data:  32
  • America’s ranking in list:  27th
  • Best Rates:   0.4 (several) — 0.5 (several)
  • USA Rate:     1.2
  • Worst rates: 1.8 (Lithuania) — 2.2 (Argentina) — 4.7 (Chile)

The worst of this bad situation for America is that, over the years, many high-ranking officials in relevant government departments such as NHTSA and the NTSB have implied or even blatantly stated that the country is doing well in highway safety and getting better!

Doing well?  No!!!  By comparison with virtually all other developed nations it is immensely regrettable that the USA is doing very badly.

As for “getting better,” this is only by comparison with America’s own past performance, and even then the death rates are rocketing back up again, after the recession that brought them down so dramatically.  If it weren’t so tragic, it would be funny how many officials claimed credit for the falling rates after the recession started but nobody is claiming or accepting any responsibility now that the situation has so tragically reversed!  Figures show that virtually all other countries have made much greater progress over the past two decades than the USA, compared to their own past performances.

The logical conclusion can only be that all of the positive publicity has been a deliberate attempt to keep the American people in the dark or — worse — completely mislead them into thinking that everything is good and acceptable.  But it is not.

Eddie Wren, CEO & Chief InstructorAdvanced Drivers of North America

 

Also see: