About One in Three of All Road Deaths Involve Speeding

Despite the attached article and additional images referring specifically to European countries, the same ‘speed’ scenario and dangers undeniably apply in the USA and Canada, too.

Infographic showing the dangers of excess speed.
A 2017 WHO infographic from Europe which is universal in its applicability in all developed nations.

Did you know that, on average, 1 in 3 deaths on roads in high-income countries are due to speed?  (More info.)

The speeds shown in the infographic, above — 30, 50 and 80 — refer to kilometres per hour (km/h) and are equivalent to 17, 31 and 50mph.

Don’t Hang Stuff from your Rearview Mirror (Unless you want to Cause a Crash!)

It is too easy for so-called experts to claim that only four or five key problems cause the majority of road crashes.  That claim is indeed true — and of course we teach trainees all about those issues — but to act as though these are the only dangers that drivers will ever face is incompetent and is asking for trouble.  There are many seemingly minor problems that collectively still cause hundreds of thousands of crashes and far too many deaths and injuries in the USA every year.  In whatever training time we have available to us, we teach our trainees how to comprehend and deal with many of these additional dangers, too.

Photo of a red tassel hanging from the rearview mirror in a car that is being driven by a person who is also using a hand-held cellphone.
It may *seem* trivial but even small objects like this, hanging from the rearview mirror and swinging around, can trick a driver’s eyes into not noticing a child or a cyclist who just happens to be at that angle to the vehicle (which typically means on a curve or at an intersection). Plenty people have died as a result of this type of seemingly innocent scenario so please take all hanging objects off your rearview mirror. This person is also using a hand-held cellphone while driving, thus making a dangerous incident dramatically more likely.    (Image copyright, 2017.)

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24 Things You Didn’t Know (or Forgot) About Safe Driving on Rural Roads!

In developed countries around the world, it has long been known that rural roads are the location for far more deaths, measured against the total miles driven, than any other type of road or highway.  And this is equally true in the U.S.A.

“Twenty-five percent of America’s road miles are driven on rural roads but this results, very disproportionately, in around fifty percent of all U.S. roadway fatalities.” —  Eddie Wren, ADoNA.

There are several contributory reasons for this very serious situation:

Photograph of two roadside memorials, on opposite sides of a rural road, and from two separate crashes.
Not one but two memorials, for two separate crashes on either side of this road at this one location in Illinois. (Photo copyright, 2012.)

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Here in the USA, it’s Workzone Awareness Week. Does that Make You Think ‘So What?’

This morning, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (a.k.a. NHTSA but pronounce it as “NiTSA“) publicized the fact that it is Workzone Awareness Week.

Photograph of a highway construction zone.
A Highway Construction Zone. (Copyright image.)

There can be no doubt that this is an important issue because, for example, in 2014 (the most-recent, detailed figures available), no fewer than 669 people were killed in construction zone  incidents.

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So-called Safe Driving Experts Post Dangerous Advice about Child Safety in Cars

How can the American public be expected to know what’s safest for themselves and their children when supposedly trustworthy sources so often publish incorrect and unsafe “advice” about safe driving techniques, or — as in this case — post highly inappropriate photographs or illustrations showing dangerous scenarios as though they are correct and acceptable?

California DMV

The photograph below first came to our attention when it was posted — outrageously — by no less an organization than the California DMV, so our first questions to them are:  Who is responsible for this?  Do they know nothing about safe driving and child safety at all?

This photograph is meant to show good child safety for the three children in the back seat of this car but all three are wearing their seatbelts in a dangerous manner (see the text of the article)/
This photograph is meant to show good child safety for the three children in the back seat of this car but all three are wearing their seatbelts in a dangerous manner (see the text of the article) — We do not claim to have copyright permission to post this image but do claim the legal right to do so for discussion of an important aspect of public safety.

The dangers shown here are that (a) the girl in the center of the three unavoidably has her seatbelt to high and effectively across her neck.  In the event of a collision, this alone could kill her.  The girl on the left also has her belt too high but not as badly as the first one.  (b) The girl on the right has her belt across her upper arm, below the shoulder (see the Irish Examiner article, linked below, for a better view of this) and there is no way this would restrain her correctly in a collision where, at the very least it might be expected to cause serious arm or shoulder injuries.

The photograph is, however, at least two years old.  We now know that a version of it was published by the Irish Examiner (newspaper) on July 04, 2015, in the ironically titled “How to keep kids well when travelling by car,”  which was about car sickness but was apparently oblivious to child seatbelt safety

Then, just three days afterwards, yet another version was published by the Gerber Life Insurance Agency, in “Activities to Keep Kids Happily Occupied  During Road Travel.”  Come on, Gerber.  Surely you have someone who should definitely have picked up on this?

The fact that these three sources all used different versions of one image might suggest that they originated from a picture library, in which case we would suggest that while such libraries are in business purely to sell images, they DO have a responsibility not to trade in misleadingly dangerous pictures!

Crash & Bull Bars on Vehicles Cause Far More Danger than they Prevent


Often bought in the name of safety, it is a fact that crash bars or bull bars can actually create greater danger not only for pedestrians, bicyclists and other vulnerable road users who get hit, but also for people traveling in the vehicles to which the bars are fitted.

Photo of a former police Ford Crown Victoria now being used as a taxi, but with crash bars still fitted.
Because of the dangers created by crash bars (a.k.a. bull bars) it is wrong that former U.S. law enforcement vehicles can be sold to the public with the bars still fitted. This should be banned. (Copyright image)

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