International Road Safety News

National and international items of relevant news will be added to this page and will hopefully provide a useful, additional resource for safety personnel.

2017

Three potential changes to the UK driving test which are intended to make newly-qualified drivers more independent and capable have been assessed by the Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) (June 14, 2017)

Evaluating Road Safety Media Campaigns (Road Safety Scotland)  This topic has been posted f.i.o. road safety professionals rather than corporate fleet safety managers.  (May 29, 2017)

The death of a five-year-old Toronto boy who was riding his bicycle on the sidewalk but fell into the path of a vehicle prompts call for more safety measures.  (May 29, 2017)

A road safety specialist in Bulgaria makes the point, valid in every country, that Traffic Law should be simplified, understandable, and its implementation should be improved.  Of particular relevance is that signs warning of speed cameras ahead should be removed because all they do is cause a brief interruption to risky driving, with no long-term reduction achieved (as it would be by means of fines).

Speeding in Europe can now result in fines up to 175% of a driver’s weekly salary (May 6, 2017)

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America’s Traffic Death Toll Is a National Disgrace (February 16, 2017)

More than 40,000 Americans were killed in traffic last year, according to new estimates from the National Safety Council, a non-profit that aims to reduce preventable deaths. That’s a 6 percent year-over-year increase, and a shocking 14 percent increase compared to two years ago.

It’s the first time traffic fatalities have surpassed 40,000 since 2007. Until recently, a long-term decline seemed irreversible as vehicle safety technology improved. But last year the number of traffic fatalities was higher in absolute terms than in 1992.

In addition, traffic crashes resulted in an estimated 4.6 million “medically consulted” injuries last year, which cost Americans $432 billion in lost wages, medical costs, lost productivity, and property damage.

In 2016, thanks in part to low gas prices, total miles driven by Americans increased 3 percent — not enough to fully explain the rising body count.

U.S. government efforts to reduce traffic deaths have been too limited compared to peer nations, the NSC said in a statement. “Our complacency is killing us. Americans believe there is nothing we can do to stop crashes from happening, but that isn’t true,” said NSC President Deborah Hersman. “The U.S. lags the rest of the developed world in addressing highway fatalities. We know what needs to be done; we just haven’t done it.”…. [More]

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