Keep Clear of Semi Tractor-Trailers at Intersections and Tight Curves

Over 4,500 people are killed each year in the USA in road collisions that involve semi tractor-trailers and other large trucks, and the majority of those killed are in smaller vehicles which, for whatever reason, are simply too close to the truck concerned.

Photo of "Wide Turn" warning signs on the spray flaps of a semi tractor-trailer.
A good proportion of large trucks, especially semi tractor-trailers, display warning signs — here on the spray flaps — about the need for them to be driven “wide” on the approach to sharp turns at intersections, yet sadly a huge number of car drivers remain oblivious to the extreme danger that can result from ignoring these warnings. (Copyright image.)

Continue reading “Keep Clear of Semi Tractor-Trailers at Intersections and Tight Curves”

Don’t Trust Tire Shops or Car Mechanics to Put Correct Pressures in Your Tires!

As a retired traffic patrol police officer, I have seen far too many bodies at road crashes so I’m fastidious about highway safety, which very much includes tire safety!

Photograph of the tread surface of a Bridgestone Blizzack winter tire.
The tread surface of a new Bridgestone Blizzack winter tire. All good winter tyres use special rubber compounds which retain pliability and grip, even at very low temperatures, and this extremely important for safety. (Copyright image. Eddie Wren, 2017.)

Continue reading “Don’t Trust Tire Shops or Car Mechanics to Put Correct Pressures in Your Tires!”

No Back Lights at Night? Blame Daytime Running Lights [DRL]

Daytime Running Lights [DRL] commonly only illuminate the front lights of a vehicle, and not the rear lights. (See the photograph below.)

Usually, they also do not illuminate the dashboard lights for the speedometer and other instruments and controls.  This is intended to alert drivers to the fact that only the DRLs are operating and therefore only the front lights are on, but as most drivers have never been adequately informed about this scenario, many just assume that there is a fault with the dashboard lights and drive on, unaware of the danger they are causing for themselves and others.

Photograph of a vehicle displaying frontal "Daytime Running Lights" (DRLs) but no rear lights -- a potentially very dangerous situation, especially in heavy rain or fog, where visibility is reduced.
A regrettably common sight in North America:  A vehicle running on Daytime Running Lights (DRLs), where the driver sees light at the front and assumes that all lights are on, but DRLs have less power than low-beam headlights and typically only operate the front lights and not the tail lights. This creates significant danger from behind, especially in heavy rain or foggy conditions that reduce visibility. Usually, the dashboard instruments are also unlit — and this is intended as a clue for the driver — but as drivers have not been adequately educated about many aspects of safe driving, many just drive on, oblivious to the danger they are causing. (Copyright image.)

Continue reading “No Back Lights at Night? Blame Daytime Running Lights [DRL]”